Never Vear For Deer

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Oxford OPP have noticed a dramatic spike in deer, vehicle collisions this summer. They are reminding motorists to slow down and always be aware of your surroundings.

OXFORD COUNTY - Oxford OPP have responded to several collisions this summer involving deer. 

With this in mind they are putting out a few safety tips for the public. Deer and vehicle collisions rates spike 1.5 hours on either side of sunset and sunrise. Motorists need to be cautious and aware of your surroundings at all times. 

Constable Ed Sanchuk says do not vear for deer if a collision is inevitable. 

"If you suddenly have a deer in your path, we encourage drivers to stay in control, reduce as much speed as possible, and whatever you do, steer straight. Don't veer for the deer. By changing your direction quickly, you increase the risk of losing control, running off the roadway and rolling your vehicle. This increases the likelihood of sustaining greater damage to your vehicle and serious injury."

The OPP offer the following tips to help you avoid a collision with wildlife:

- Look all around, not just straight ahead. Deer will often run across the road from    ditches and protected areas such as stream corridors and woodlots.

- Where you see one deer, expect more. Deer often travel in herds.

- Slow down. The slower you go, the more time you have to react should you encounter a deer

- Deer can move across roads at any time of the day or year but anticipate higher deer movements in the fall and around sunrise & sunset.

- Watch for glowing eyes of deer at night

- Don't vear for deer. Should a deer run into the path of your vehicle, reduce your speed quickly, steer straight and stay in control. 

- Remove all distractions. Give yourself the best chance possible to see and predict where deer might go.

- Buckle up. If you need to stop in a hurry, you want your body restrained to prevent unnecessary injury or possibly death.

 

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